1. What is the purpose of government?
Barbary Kay, Chico ISD Place 6:
To serve the needs of the people by providing service for all while preserving individual rights and
freedom.
Jennifer Stephens, NWISD Place 5:
The purpose of government in the United States is to provide for the common good and promote
the general welfare of its citizens. This includes protecting individual rights, providing essential
public services such as education, healthcare, and infrastructure, maintaining a stable and
prosperous economy, ensuring the safety and security of its citizens, and upholding the rule of
law. The government is also responsible for representing the interests of its citizens both
domestically and on the world stage, and for preserving and protecting the country's democratic
system and constitutional principles.
Jon Pendergrass, NWISD Place 6:
The Governments purpose found in the United States Constitution "We the people of the United
States, in order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic tranquility,
provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the Blessings of
Liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United
States of America." I believe the Constitution is crystal clear in defining the purpose of our
Government. We the people of the United States (choose/elect) who we send to serve as public
servants, elected representatives. The Government was established to work for "we the people."
It was designed to protect our God given liberties enshrined in the Constitution.
Michelle Slater, NWISD Place 7:
The purpose of government is to protect the rights and freedoms of its citizens, while limiting its
own power and interference in our lives. The government's role should be focused on maintaining
law and order, protecting our borders and national security, and promoting an environment that
allows for economic growth and individual prosperity. It is not the government's job to control
every aspect of our lives or to redistribute wealth through excessive taxation and regulation.
Rather, it should be focused on empowering individuals and businesses to succeed on their own
merits, while providing a safety net for those truly in need. In essence, the purpose of government
should be to create a society where individuals are free to pursue their own dreams and
aspirations, without fear of government overreach or interference.
Deb Spencer, Boyd ISD Place 1:
To serve the citizens I work for. To listen to their concerns and act on them. To fight for the true,
right and conservative values of our community. To advocate for the needs of children and their
education. A school board is a unit of local government that determines the policy, budget,
leadership, and administration within a district's public schools. The members of a school board
are elected by its citizens, which enables people who are passionate about education to
participate in the public education process. The role of the school board is to make decisions
about curriculum, school buildings and maintenance, annual budgets and more by consulting with
parents, teachers, and the superintendent.
Cindy Barksdale, Chico ISD Place 7:
I believe the purpose of government is to protect our inalienable rights of life, liberty, and pursuit
of happiness. It is also to protect the border from outside influence. I also believe the forefathers
constructed the constitution and freedoms from the Christian belief of free will.
Sandra Schneider, Decatur ISD School Board Place 3:
To protect the liberties of We the People.
Jeremy Duncan, Decatur ISD Place 4:
To guide for the people by the people, and protect from outside forces
Kenneth D. Lee, Alvord ISD Place 6:
To serve the people of the United States
2. With which major political party do you identify most closely?
Barbary Kay, Chico ISD Place 6:
Republican
Jennifer Stephens, NWISD Place 5:
Republican
Jon Pendergrass, NWISD Place 6:
Republican
Michelle Slater, NWISD Place 7:
Republican
Deb Spencer, Boyd ISD Place 1:
Republican
Cindy Barksdale, Chico ISD Place 7:
Republican
Sandra Schneider, Decatur ISD School Board Place 3:
Republican
Jeremy Duncan, Decatur ISD Place 4:
Republican
Kenneth D. Lee, Alvord ISD Place 6:
Republican
3. Why did you decide to run for school board of your district?
Barbary Kay, Chico ISD Place 6:
Because young people are the future of our nation. They should be prepared for that leadership
while being protected. Education is a right, not a privilege and it is essential that every student be
given the opportunity to achieve to their fullest.
Jennifer Stephens, NWISD Place 5:
I believe that our public school system and our country are under attack. The school system has
been infiltrated with radical policies and ideologies that threaten the well-being and academic
success of our students. In my view, classrooms are no longer neutral places that focus on
academic excellence, but rather political battlegrounds of disorganized chaos.
As a mother and educator, I offer a unique perspective on the board. I believe that I have the
ability to support teachers and make classrooms a safe and neutral place that allows all students
an equal opportunity. I also believe that giving the voice back to parents is essential, as they
should have a say in their children's education.
I am motivated to run for school board because I care deeply about the well-being of students
and believe that my experience and perspective as a mother and educator can make a positive
difference in the education system. I am committed to ensuring that our public schools provide a
high-quality education to all students, and I am dedicated to working with other board members to
create a school system that prioritizes academic excellence and fosters a safe and supportive
learning environment for all students.
Jon Pendergrass, NWISD Place 6:
As the Director of the Center for Career and Professional Development at Dallas Baptist
University, I help students achieve success after graduation through mentorship, resources, and
corporate partnerships. These initiatives help students develop a strategic plan that will help
guide them towards a successful and fulfilling career path.
I am excited to be running for school board. As a passionate advocate for education, I believe
that every child deserves access to a high-quality education that prepares them for success in
life. I chose a career in higher education because I wanted to work with and influence the next
generation of leaders. I have seen firsthand the transformative power of education and the
incredible potential that lies within every student. As a father to a young son named Worth, I
understand the importance of ensuring that every child receives a quality education. I want to
ensure that my son and every student in our district have access to the resources, tools, and
support they need to succeed academically and personally. Unfortunately, there is a concerning
culture shift taking place within school districts in our region, where politics and ideological
agendas are being prioritized over the needs and well-being of our students. As a school board
member, I will work to protect students and teachers from this distracting influence and ensure
that our classrooms are focused on teaching rather than indoctrination. I am dedicated to
ensuring that every student in our district has the opportunity to achieve their full potential. I
believe that I have the skills, experience, and vision necessary to make a positive impact on our
school system.
Michelle Slater, NWISD Place 7:
I decided to run for school board because as a Northwest ISD Mom, I care deeply about our
community and the future of our children. I believe that being an advocate for the families in our
district is essential, and I want to work towards protecting and enhancing our community.
I am committed to serving families and helping them avoid some of the challenges that our
children face. As a parent, I understand the importance of having a school board that listens to
the needs and concerns of families. My only goal is to serve the community and listen to your
ideas, so that we can work together to create positive change for our children and families.
I believe that by working together, we can provide a safe, nurturing, and high-quality education for
all students in our district. As a member of the school board, I am committed to ensuring that our
schools prioritize academic excellence, offer a supportive learning environment, and provide the
necessary resources to help all students succeed.
Overall, I am running for school board because I want to make a difference in the lives of our
children and families. I believe that through collaboration, communication, and dedication, we can
create a bright future for our community and celebrate the joys and successes of our NISD
community.
Deb Spencer, Boyd ISD Place 1:
Boyd is a conservative community; but, we have a influx of new housing being built. We must
actively address the effects this population will have on our district. We must protect and defend
our children in every decision made. We cannot be complacent on our board. We must have
specific policies in place that will address each of these issues and, during mandatory new
parent/student orientation, address each of these potential issues. We need to engage and share
our community conservative values with new individuals as we welcome them into our town.
Cindy Barksdale, Chico ISD Place 7:
As a 27 year educator I see firsthand the drastic changes in education. I wanted to take action in
my hometown to keep as much of the influence from changes out of our district.
Sandra Schneider, Decatur ISD School Board Place 3:
To effect change, you must start at the level of government closest to the people. I am passionate
about education and protecting our children.
Jeremy Duncan, Decatur ISD Place 4:
Transparency, and being an advocate for the teachers
Kenneth D. Lee, Alvord ISD Place 6:
To help make the school better for all the kids in the district
4. How have you prepared to be a member of your district’s school board?
Barbary Kay, Chico ISD Place 6:
As a current board member, I have completed all required classes, as well as additional
educational opportunities, when available. I make myself available to members of the public, in
order to understand what they consider important for their children.
Jennifer Stephens, NWISD Place 5:
I have gained extensive experience in education as an educator. I have spent many years
teaching and working closely with students, parents, and other educators. This experience has
allowed me to develop a deep understanding of the challenges and opportunities that exist in the
education system.
In addition to my teaching experience, I have also actively sought out opportunities to develop my
leadership skills. I have completed leadership training programs, served on committees and task
forces, and held leadership positions within my school and community. These experiences have
taught me how to effectively communicate with others, build consensus, and make informed
decisions that benefit all stakeholders.
Furthermore, I have taken the time to familiarize myself with the policies and procedures of the
school board, and I have researched the issues facing my district. This has allowed me to
understand the various factors that impact education in my community and develop a strategic
plan for addressing them.
I have also engaged with parents, educators, and other stakeholders in my district to gain a
broader perspective on the issues facing our schools. This has allowed me to develop a deeper
understanding of the needs and concerns of our community and to better represent their interests
on the school board.
Overall, I believe that my experience as an educator, my leadership training, my research, and
my engagement with the community have prepared me to be an effective member of my district's
school board. I am committed to using my knowledge and skills to improve the education system
and ensure that all students have access to high-quality education.
Jon Pendergrass, NWISD Place 6:
I have been Directing and teaching within Higher Education for the past seven years. Over the
course of these last three years, I have noticed a significant change within our incoming freshman
students. They are incredibly quiet, reserved, shy, and afraid to discuss important cultural topics
impacting our Nation today. I began to inquire why they refuse to discuss such topics. Their
response is simple "because if we share how we truly feel, we will be ostracized for our beliefs."
This is disturbing on so many levels, I felt lead to get involved the only way I knew how. I began to
watch Board meetings, read new stories from other school districts within our region, and inquire
about various Texas legislation and bills impacting our public school systems. I decided to look
into our districts academic proficiency rates in the basics. 60% proficient in reading and 63%
proficient in math. I am left feeling like many of us feel today, our culture is shifting and our
current leadership thinks we are doing great. I thought to myself "if not me, who? Who will run,
ask the difficult questions, and help turn our district around?" After a great deal of prayer and
affirmation that I was qualified, I made the decision to run for School Board.
Michelle Slater, NWISD Place 7:
Taking on a leadership role is natural for me. I currently sit on two boards within my company,
local leadership as well as global leadership. I am president of Kai Ken Society of America and
also partake on my HOA and PTA board.
As someone who is passionate about serving my community, I have taken several steps to
prepare myself to be a member of the school board. Firstly, I have extensive experience in
leadership roles. I currently sit on two boards within my company, one at the local level and the
other at the global level. This experience has given me the skills necessary to communicate
effectively, build consensus, and make informed decisions.
In addition to my corporate experience, I have also taken on leadership roles within my
community. I am currently the president of Kai Ken Society of America, an organization dedicated
to preserving the Japanese breed of dogs. I also participate in my homeowner's association and
serve on the PTA board of my child's school. These experiences have taught me how to work
collaboratively with others and to prioritize the needs and concerns of the community.
Furthermore, I have taken the time to research the policies and procedures of the school board
and to familiarize myself with the issues facing our district. This has allowed me to develop a
strategic plan for addressing these issues and to be better equipped to make informed decisions
that benefit all stakeholders.
Overall, I feel that my experience in leadership, both in the corporate world and within my
community, as well as my research and understanding of the issues facing our district, have
prepared me to be an effective member of the school board. I am committed to using my skills
and knowledge to create positive change for our children and families and to ensure that our
schools provide a safe, nurturing, and high-quality education for all students.
Deb Spencer, Boyd ISD Place 1:
I have 25 years experience in education administration. I have attended and received 6 CEU
credits for the course "Back to Basics", a Trustee training by Innovative Teachers of Texas. I have
attended SHAC training. I am attending BISD School Board meetings. I am active in state
legislature as it relates to education. I am actively reading and learning about Texas education
and keeping up-to-date on all the current issues.
Cindy Barksdale, Chico ISD Place 7:
I am a 27th year as an educator, with a wide range of experience in several districts. I have also
served on the Chico City Council as Mayor Pro Tem, 4-H Leader, Sunday School and Bible Study
Leader, and most recently I have been appointed as Precinct 12 Chair for the Wise County
Republican Party.
Sandra Schneider, Decatur ISD School Board Place 3:
I have researched a lot of the current obstacles that our students and parents are facing. I have
tried to educate myself with school safety programs and the options that are available to us. I
have met with teachers and parents and listened to their concerns with our current school board.
Jeremy Duncan, Decatur ISD Place 4:
Listen to Teachers and tax payers concerns
Kenneth D. Lee, Alvord ISD Place 6:
Coach of the Baseball Team and try to be as involved as possible
5. 85% of Wise County vote Republican. What does this mean to you as a decision maker for
county schools?
Barbary Kay, Chico ISD Place 6:
This means that conservative values are important and that those values should be maintained in
local districts while maintaining a high quality of education for every student.
Jennifer Stephens, NWISD Place 5:
That figure indicates to me the importance of conducting thorough research on the candidates to
accurately represent the values of Wise County. It is crucial for voters to ensure that the
candidates they elect are capable of effectively supporting their constituents. As a candidate, it is
my responsibility not only to communicate my values clearly, but also to continue serving my
community and upholding our shared values once elected. By being aware of the needs and
concerns of my constituents, I am committed to fulfilling my duties as a representative of the
community. Furthermore, I am dedicated to maintaining open communication and actively
engaging with my constituents to ensure that their voices are heard, and their needs are
addressed. It is my privilege and obligation to serve the people who have entrusted me with their
vote, and I will diligently work to fulfill their expectations and honor their values. This reinforces
the importance of being accountable, transparent, and responsive to the needs of the community
throughout my tenure as an elected representative. Together, we can work towards a prosperous
and inclusive future for Wise County. Let us join hands and strive for a better tomorrow.
Jon Pendergrass, NWISD Place 6:
This means a majority of the Great people of Wise County are conservative. What we are really
saying is 85% of the people in Wise County vote with conservative values. We adhere to a value
system that believes in the Constitution, strong States rights, a limited Federal government, and
policies that are fiscally responsible, IE. Keeping taxes low and ensuring the money we work hard
for remains in our pocket. Our school board impacts our tax rate and we need to operate as
responsible fiduciaries. Each of us are stakeholders in this district. Whether you are a young
parent, empty nester, or do not have kids in the district, we all have an invested interest in NISD.
Parents rights are extremely important to me. I want to ensure we grant our parents living within
our district strong parents rights. We need to honor the authority they already possess as parents.
They need to know what their children are learning and feel like they play a part in their children's
education. I also feel someone needs to be a strong advocate for our teachers and ensure they
feel supported. Do the policies on the books make sense or serve as a hinderance? I share your
values and want to represent each of you for this next season.
Michelle Slater, NWISD Place 7:
While respecting the Texas GOP platform priorities, my focus is on creating the best possible
environment for education for the district's students. My responsibility as a school board member
is to ensure that our schools provide a high-quality education that prepares our students for
success in their future endeavors, regardless of their political affiliation. This means prioritizing
academic achievement and closing gaps in areas where students are struggling. While it is
important to understand the political landscape of the county, I firmly believe that decisions
regarding education should be based on what is best for our students and community, not
partisan politics. Overall, my focus as a decision maker for county schools is on creating an
environment that supports academic excellence and success for all students, regardless of their
political affiliation or background.
Deb Spencer, Boyd ISD Place 1:
One of the main reasons we chose to live in Wise County was the high Republican vote. I am a
conservative advocate for children and their education. I will work hard to keep liberal ideology
out of our district and for the most part, I feel that my constituents agree with me.
Cindy Barksdale, Chico ISD Place 7:
Chico ISD statics would be similar to Wise County, it is a conservative school district consisting of
conservative values. I am a conservative and will approach issues with a conservative mindset.
Sandra Schneider, Decatur ISD School Board Place 3:
It means that conservative values such as fiscal responsibility and banning CRT are extremely
important to the majority of our residents.
The number one purpose of the School Board should be to create an environment for the best
possible education for your district’s students:
Jeremy Duncan, Decatur ISD Place 4:
Stick with my Christian and Conservative values
Kenneth D. Lee, Alvord ISD Place 6:
I would take each situation as it comes and not base it on any Political Party
6. The number one purpose of the School Board should be to create an environment for the best
possible education for your district’s students:
a. What is your district’s ranking in Texas?
b. What do you plan to do to improve that ranking?
Barbary Kay, Chico ISD Place 6:
Although I don't know the exact current ranking, I am aware that there is always room for
improvement and it is the goal of the board and the district to continue to improve instruction
through outstanding staff, technology improvements, and targeting learning to increase individual
achievement. Giving our students the best possible education is something continually
emphasized by every member of our board.
Jennifer Stephens, NWISD Place 5:
They have gone backwards from an A to a B in academic achievement and closing the gaps and
only 60% of students are proficient in reading and 63% in math. There is much need for
improvement.
While it is important to understand the political landscape of the county, my primary focus is on
creating the best possible environment for education for the district's students.
To me, this means prioritizing academic achievement and closing gaps in areas where students
are struggling.
Currently, the district's ranking in Texas has gone backwards from an A to a B in academic
achievement and closing the gaps. Additionally, only 60% of students are proficient in reading
and 63% in math. This is unacceptable, and there is a significant need for improvement.
To improve this ranking, I plan to ensure that money is spent inside the classroom first and that
response to intervention and other academic programs are well invested in to support our
struggling students. I also believe that it is important to provide professional development
opportunities for teachers so that they are equipped with the necessary tools to support student
success.
Overall, my focus as a decision maker for county schools is on creating an environment that
supports academic excellence and success for all students, regardless of their political affiliation
or background.
Jon Pendergrass, NWISD Place 6:
Currently our District is given an overall grade of "B." Out of 1198 school districts in our State, we
currently sit at 234. This puts us in the top 20% of districts. Part of my plan includes the following:
1. Ensuring we have a tough policy in place to prevent ridiculous and distracting content from
being taught in our classrooms that are not conducive to achieving academic excellence. IE.
Ridiculous political ideology that serves as a hinderance to our students.
2. Our districts mission & vision states- "Northwest Independent School District School District.
With a vision of empowering learners and leaders to positively impact the world, NISD is
committed to providing all students with an education that prepares them for the future-whether in
college, the workforce, or military." This is a wonderful mission; however, we need to go back to
the basics. We need to put a strong emphasis in mastering our reading proficiency grades 1-3. If
our children struggle to read, they cannot adequately read their textbooks and this is problematic
for their future and our community. This is where a major investment of time and resource needs
to take place in my opinion. If we start here, I am certain we can see our state ranking and
performance increase substantially. I would also like to state that if our students cannot read, how
can they read their Constitution or Bill of Rights? We have lots of work to accomplish.
Michelle Slater, NWISD Place 7:
B - This is a drop from previous years
First, I believe that it is crucial to adopt evidence-based curriculum that is rooted in proven
educational practices. We need to prioritize academic excellence over divisive and controversial
ideologies like DEI and SEL. By focusing on evidence-based curriculum, we can ensure that our
students are receiving a well-rounded education that prepares them for success in their future
endeavors.
Second, I plan to regularly evaluate the effectiveness of academic programs and offerings. We
need to make adjustments as necessary to ensure they meet the evolving needs of the student
population and promote higher comprehension rates. This includes investing in programs that
support struggling students and providing professional development opportunities for our
teachers.
I am confident that we can improve our district's ranking and provide the best possible education
for our students.
Deb Spencer, Boyd ISD Place 1:
The ranking of Boyd ISD for 2021-2022 is 80 (B). We must get back to the core curriculum of
reading, writing, math, science and true history and be more aggressive in teaching these skills.
Our children must be competent in all subjects. We cannot push children forward if they have not
accomplished their grade level. We, as administrators and teachers, are here to help children
thrive.
Cindy Barksdale, Chico ISD Place 7:
The TEA ranking was B, the ranking throughout Texas is halfway, the exact # changes based on
the source.
Work with Superintendent to improve specific goals for district to improve academics and college,
career, and military readiness. The scores at the middle school was lowest in the district by far,
continue to hear goals and data from Middle School principal on ways to address the deficit. In
January 2021 and December 2022, Superintendent and High School Principal stated it that
students say they are not ready for College. Goals and discussion need to include, professional
development, increased academic focus, and realignment Dual Credit classes.
Sandra Schneider, Decatur ISD School Board Place 3:
We are ranked 515 on public school review.com. If we get back to reading, writing, and arithmetic
then I believe our numbers will improve. Teachers shouldn't be worried about being sued or losing
their job if they don't address a student by their preferred pronoun, nor should they fear
misgendering someone or having to decide which bathroom a biological male uses (should be the
boys bathroom)
Jeremy Duncan, Decatur ISD Place 4:
Decatur sets in the 48-50 percentile in the state. I believe working with the teachers and listening
to their needs and concerns.
Kenneth D. Lee, Alvord ISD Place 6:
District Rating is 10/10
I will work closely with Parents and Teachers to continue to Strive to excel in Academic
Performance as well as stay within policies and procedures and make our School the best it can
be.
7. Character Education is mandated by the state. Schools have adapted Transformative Social and
Emotional learning curricula that promote critical race theory and gender ideology. What do you
know regarding the curricula being used in your school district as Character Education and how
you will ensure that the curricula does not promote CRT and gender ideology?
Barbary Kay, Chico ISD Place 6:
It is the current policy of Chico ISD that CRT not be included as any part of the curricula.
Jennifer Stephens, NWISD Place 5:
The state mandates character traits but it does not mandate how it is taught. Tying character
traits to transformative SEL is not required and therefore does not necessarily need to be in the
district. The current framework that my district uses is comprised of CASEL competencies and
the state counseling competencies. CASEL is known to work towards and promote equal
outcomes as opposed to equal opportunities. I believe there are other methods of providing our
students a rich education that covers all curriculum in a neutral way that develops critical thinking
skills as opposed to gender ideologies.
Jon Pendergrass, NWISD Place 6:
I will stand as strong a steel wall to prevent any social emotional learning rooted in (or) tied to
divisive critical race theory. Teaching our students there is an oppressor and an oppressed has
ZERO room in our education system. SEL is currently being used within our district. The current
board has stated it is mandated by the State of Texas. They assure it is does not have roots in
CASEL; however, when you compare the flower diagram our district developed/adopted to
administer this program, it looks remarkably identical to the CASEL SEL concentric circle
diagram. Our district chose to utilize a flower versus a circle. One incumbent said "It is not a one
size fits all program." I interpret this to mean each teacher has the freedom to teach what works
best for their classroom. When do academics vary from one student to the next? I sincerely
believe this is a trojan horse for CRT. Regardless if there is a state mandate, our district needs a
guideline to protect our students and our teachers. Gender ideology has ramped up substantially
these past few years. Our district needs to have a clear and concise policy to protect our students
and teachers. Biological restroom policies to ensure everyone understands there are guidelines in
place that protects everyone. As I knock on doors, I am hearing concerns from parents regarding
their students being asked about their pronouns. Again, this falls within my belief that political
ideologies do not belong in our schools or classrooms. I would like to see policies in place
preventing future requirements to adhere to such practices.
Michelle Slater, NWISD Place 7:
I am deeply concerned about the promotion of controversial ideologies like critical race theory
and gender ideology in our schools. It is important to ensure that our curricula is focused on
academic excellence and is free from any divisive or controversial ideologies. As a member of the
school board, I will work to ensure that the curricula being used in our district is evidence-based
and not promoting CRT or gender ideology. To achieve this, I will regularly review and evaluate
the curricula being used in our district to ensure that they are aligned with our goals of promoting
academic excellence and providing a well-rounded education for our students. I will work with
other board members, parents, and teachers to ensure that the curricula being used is
appropriate for all students and is not promoting any divisive or controversial ideologies.
Deb Spencer, Boyd ISD Place 1:
I am happy to say that Boyd ISD has chosen not to use SEL curriculum. We follow the TECs for
Character Traits Education and incorporate these requirements in other subjects. I am not in favor
of any CRT or gender ideology indoctrination and will always work hard to keep this out of Boyd
ISD. Our school should be free of political and social agenda and remain focused on the primary
goal of education to prepare the next generation for success through the concentration of basic
core knowledge and skills.
Cindy Barksdale, Chico ISD Place 7:
SEL could be one of the Trojan horses in a school district to bring in Liberal political social
ideology, such as CRT and gender ideology. I have worked closely with the SHAC committee to
ensure CISD keeps CRT and gender Ideology curriculum out of our district.
Sandra Schneider, Decatur ISD School Board Place 3:
I have met with Dr. Wooten and Decatur ISD claims we do not teach CRT or gender ideology. I do
think we need to adopt some local policies that prohibit teaching either of these in the future,
regardless of whether it is in place or not. Since “SEL” is mandated by TEKS, I will lead the way
in proposing policies that teach Patriotic Civics, with a focus on real American history and love of
country.
Jeremy Duncan, Decatur ISD Place 4:
Create local policies following the guide lines that the state of Texas has set forth
Kenneth D. Lee, Alvord ISD Place 6:
To teach Core Values such as Trustworthiness, respect, responsibility, fairness and caring.
8. Rapid Onset Gender Dysphoria is occurring all across our country. What do you know of this
phenomenon and how will you, as a school board member, ensure that your district has policies
in place to deal with this and make sure that parental rights are protected?
Barbary Kay, Chico ISD Place 6:
As this issue has not come up in our district, a policy has not been established. Education and
safety are the primary focus of our board, while ensuring that both parents' and students' rights
are protected.
Jennifer Stephens, NWISD Place 5:
It is suggested that social influences from peer groups and social media may contribute to this
phenomenon. As an educator, I believe schools should have policies that safeguard teachers and
students from feeling pressured to tolerate such situations. This is one reason why I am not
supportive of social emotional learning or critical race theory (CRT), as they have been misused
to promote tolerance unequally and impose acceptance on the majority of students, while
privileging certain subsets of the student population
Jon Pendergrass, NWISD Place 6:
As I mentioned in the previous response, we are beginning to experience an influx of gender
dysphoria. With Title IX being so fluid under the Biden administration, it will be up to the local
school boards to ensure we have protective measures in place to prevent distractions within our
district. One of the primary policies that need to be put to vote is a policy on restrooms being
designated to your biological sex. Again, schools are not designed to practice social experiments.
Sound and logical policies will help secure our students, faculty, and staff.
Michelle Slater, NWISD Place 7:
It is important that we have policies in place to address this issue in a way that protects the rights
of all students, including parental rights. I am committed to ensuring that our district has clear and
effective policies in place to address ROGD while respecting the rights of all involved. To achieve
this, I will work with other board members, parents, and teachers to develop policies and
procedures that are fact based. We need to make sure that parental rights are protected, and that
parents have a say in decisions that affect their children. I am committed to ensuring that parents
are involved in the decision-making process and that their rights are respected at all times.
Deb Spencer, Boyd ISD Place 1:
Rapid Onset Gender Dysphoria is a mental disease that has been brought on by internet
propaganda. It is not physical. It is mental. Any child who "thinks" they are a different sex has
mental issues in their past. God does not make mistakes. He chose us to be who we are.
I am very familiar with policies and have written and worked with them during my 25 years of
administration. We must have specific policies in place addressing these gender dysphoria issues
that will be legally sound. I would be happy to work on any committee to develop policies related
to stopping ROGD in our schools.
Cindy Barksdale, Chico ISD Place 7:
I would vote against any policy that does not align with the community’s values. I believe there
should be a policy stating the gender/pronoun will reflect what is on the legal document (birth
certificate) turned in during registration. I also, believe is a student wants to be called something
other than the legal name; parents can list the nicknames during registration. This also includes
not accepting policy blindly from TASB services and reviewing those policies that might not align
properly with community standards.
Sandra Schneider, Decatur ISD School Board Place 3:
It is not the school or teacher’s place to discuss sexuality or gender with any student, especially
without the parent’s knowledge. I believe that the affirmation approach can be incredibly
damaging to those kids that are just trying to find themselves. It is not the job of the school to
either affirm or deny anyone's chosen identity, however, students should be addressed and
identified by their gender at time of birth. I will advance a policy that deals with this as well to
eliminate gender bender from our District.
Jeremy Duncan, Decatur ISD Place 4:
With correct policies in place this would keep the ISD from intervening while allowing parents to
parent.
Kenneth D. Lee, Alvord ISD Place 6:
I don't know much about this other than the unease that a person may have because of a
Mismatch between ones gender identity.
9. What is your district’s policy on the teaching of human sexuality? Do you agree with that policy
and if not, how would you change it?
Barbary Kay, Chico ISD Place 6:
The district's policy is that human sexuality is primarily the responsibility of parents and any and
all instruction in this area will be available for review by parents. As a board liaison to the school's
SHAC committee, I was involved in the development of this policy. I approve of our policy and feel
we have made the right choice for our district and community.
Jennifer Stephens, NWISD Place 5:
As a school board member, I strongly believe that parents should play a fundamental role in
teaching their children about topics such as human sexuality. Parents know what information is
age-appropriate for their child and therefore it is parents right to educate their children about this
topic. Texas House Bill 1525 requires school districts to notify and get parental consent before the
student can participate in a human sexuality curriculum and as part of my role on the school
board, I will ensure that our district's policies and procedures align with this law and actively
involve parents in the decision-making process.
Jon Pendergrass, NWISD Place 6:
If we are talking about sexuality regarding the human reproductive system, this needs to remain
in our Anatomy and Physiology textbooks. Biology books may touch on these as well. Any other
topics of human sexuality needs to come from the parent and this is where parents rights come
in. The state should not be teaching human sexuality outside of academic courses teaching
anatomical or physiological functions. In 2021 Texas HB 1525 stated that human sexuality
requires additional parent notification and access to curriculum materials. The bill also requires
school districts to get written consent from parents before providing sex education, rather than
allowing parents to simply opt out of sex ed. Again, every district needs to ensure there is a
strong policy in place to ensure we are not requiring students to learn about human sexuality and
prevent teachers from having to teach this subject.
Michelle Slater, NWISD Place 7:
I strongly believe that parents should play a crucial role in teaching their children about topics like
sex education, cyber-safety, AIDS, wellness, and bullying. Parents are responsible for deciding
what is age-appropriate information for their children, creating a safe home environment for open
discussions, and developing essential life skills. While I understand the importance of providing
accurate and comprehensive information to our students, I believe that it is ultimately the parents'
responsibility to teach their children about human sexuality. As a school board member, I will work
to ensure that our district's policies and procedures reflect this belief and that parents are involved
in the decision-making process.
The current policy does not reflect this belief, I work with other board members, parents, and
teachers to develop policies that are in line with this principle. We need to ensure that our policies
and procedures support and promote the role of parents in their children's education and
development.
Deb Spencer, Boyd ISD Place 1:
Boyd ISD does not have a specific class on human sexuality. I do agree with that policy. I believe
it is the parent's responsibility to teach their children about human sexuality.
Cindy Barksdale, Chico ISD Place 7:
We do not teach human sexuality at CISD and if it is it is taught through opt-in procedures. The
SHAC committee viewed, with the community, different curriculums this summer and decided not
to use those curriculums.
Sandra Schneider, Decatur ISD School Board Place 3:
I don’t know what the policy is at this time but I believe that this falls under SHAC and therefor is
made up of community members.
Jeremy Duncan, Decatur ISD Place 4:
To my knowledge there is not a current policy, however there should be a policy that sex
biological science not fluid
Kenneth D. Lee, Alvord ISD Place 6:
I believe this is the responsibility of the parent
10. Parents across the country are very concerned about books found in school libraries that have
graphic sexual content and are promoting CRT. Do you agree with this concern? How will you, as
a school board member, balance 1st amendment rights with protecting our children against
pornography in our school libraries and other dangerous ideologies being available to our
students without parental consent?
Barbary Kay, Chico ISD Place 6:
As a current board member, I am concerned with content of books that contain age inappropriate
content or ideas. As a current Chico Public Library, Inc. board member, I do believe in the 1st
amendment as pertains to censorship, but feel that there are certain things which might be
viewed by a high school student which should never be seen by a younger student. Parents
should have the right to question the content of what their child reads and bring such to the
attention of the school board for a formal review. If the volume in question is deemed totally
unacceptable by a review panel appointed by the school board, the volume could be removed
from open shelving.
Jennifer Stephens, NWISD Place 5:
I am deeply concerned about the continued presence of sexually explicit materials and books in
our schools, including in both school libraries and teacher's classroom libraries. It is unacceptable
that parents are unaware of the books their children have access to. As a school board member, I
strongly believe it is crucial to implement a policy that grants parents the right to review and
approve materials before their child is exposed to them, and the ability to opt in or opt out based
on their own judgment. It is the responsibility of the school district to provide complete
transparency to parents and allow them to make informed decisions about what is appropriate for
their child. The role of schools is not to make these decisions, but rather to work collaboratively
with parents to ensure that children are exposed to age-appropriate and respectful educational
materials. I am committed to advocating for policies that prioritize parental involvement and
safeguard the well-being of our students, while respecting the values and expectations of our
community.
Jon Pendergrass, NWISD Place 6:
Several things regarding this subject. I have made it clear that I am not for banning content. I am
about ensuring all content is appropriate. Here is the simple test we can apply to all printed and
electronic materials: Is it appropriate? Would this material be appropriate in the workplace? If the
answer is "no" it does not belong in our libraries or classrooms. I would also ask the questions:
Does the material contain sexually explicit imagery or text? If yes, it does not belong in our
classrooms or libraries.
Michelle Slater, NWISD Place 7:
Parents across the country are very concerned regarding books in school libraries that contain
graphic sexual content and promote controversial ideologies like critical race theory (CRT). I
strongly believe that it is not appropriate for our school libraries to contain books with graphic
sexual content or materials that promote CRT. I am against these types of materials being
available to our students without parental consent.
I believe that we need to provide parents with clear information about the materials available in
our school libraries and ensure that they have the ability to opt-out of any materials they deem
inappropriate. This will allow parents to play an active role in their children's education and protect
their children from any materials they believe are harmful.
My priority as a school board member will be to ensure that our school libraries are safe and
appropriate for all students. I am against graphic sexual content found in the libraries that are
promoting CRT, and I will work tirelessly to ensure that our students have access to high-quality
materials that promote academic excellence and success.
Deb Spencer, Boyd ISD Place 1:
I definitely agree with this concern. I do not agree with any obscenity in books in the classrooms
or libraries. Policy must be in place that states, "Nowhere on any campus will there be any of
these books, including teacher’s closets. This would include language, sexuality, gender ideology
or CRT. It is indefensible to make available sexually inappropriate material to minors for any
purpose. This erotic literature violates the penal code and does not have any educational value
for youth".
The simple problem is, books are not being vetted in our school libraries. I purpose either the
School Health Advisory Council (SHAC) or a subcommittee of SHAC review every book in the
district. Questionable books will be removed from the campus. We must protect our children from
inappropriate sexual indoctrination in our education curriculum. If parents want their children to
have these inappropriate books, they can buy them and keep them at home.
Cindy Barksdale, Chico ISD Place 7:
I have read excerpts from some of the books that were very graphic and gave specific directions
in sexual context depicting gay sex. First, I would read a book that is questioned, I don’t like
someone to tell me how to think, I like to have firsthand knowledge to make an opinion. I believe
age appropriate and book banning are different concepts. There is an opt-in law to teach
sexuality in Texas. Some of the graphic depiction in the books teach sexuality, therefore, breaking
the law of opt in for parent approval.
Sandra Schneider, Decatur ISD School Board Place 3:
I am greatly concerned with what our kids are being exposed to. I believe that school libraries
should be free from explicit material and teachings that the majority of our community is against.
If a parent wants to allow access to those materials then they can introduce it themselves. If a
book is valuable to what is being taught, it can be kept in an explicit material section and can only
be accessed with written and verified approval by the parent. There is ZERO place in our schools
for Marxist ideology like CRT and we should ban it permanently via policies.
Jeremy Duncan, Decatur ISD Place 4:
By creating policies that only allow age specific books to the appropriate age groups, with
parental consent in the libraries both public and teachers personal libraries
Kenneth D. Lee, Alvord ISD Place 6:
I do believe there is some concern for some books, I don't believe there should be books
with graphic sexual content in schools. However I also believe as the First amendment reads
"Congress makes no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting its free exercise"
Again, I believe this is the responsibility of the parent.
11. One proposed change to bond elections is that state and local bond election should follow the
following guidelines:
a. Be required to include the amount of debt currently outstanding, current debt service
payments, current per capita debt obligations, the amount of new debt being proposed,
estimated debt service for the new debt, and estimated per capita burden being
proposed.
b. Any bond election (state or local) would have to pass with at least a 2/3 majority of voters
to affirm the bond.
c. The bond issue would have to obtain a yes vote of a minimum of 20% of registered
voters.
d. All elections of personnel responsible for adopting a budget and a property tax rate and
all elections involving bond indebtedness would be held on the November uniform
election date and administered by the County Clerk or the County Elections
Administrator.
e. Any government entity should not spend taxpayer dollars in promoting further
indebtedness or spending of taxpayer dollars via mass media.
f. Be in opposition to bundling of items on bond election ballots.
Do you agree or disagree with these proposals? Why or why not?
Barbary Kay, Chico ISD Place 6:
1. I do not have a problem with the financial disclosure as most of these items are currently a
matter of public record anyway. The amount of new debt and estimated per capita burden are a
standard of information provided and providing estimated debt service would be just that, an
estimate which could change easily.
2. I disagree. Currently the main item requiring a 2/3 majority vote is a federal constitutional
amendment. Majority vote is the current standard and should be maintained.
3. I disagree. While any entity proposing a bond election should encourage voter turnout,
requiring a vote with 20% of registered voters to pass, could in effect, nullify a legitimate election
by involved voters. Voter apathy should never punish our students.
4. I feel that moving the local elections (city and school board) to the general election in
November would probably cause local issues to get lost in the larger issues. While State and
county issues can and should be handled in the November elections, local ones should remain as
they are.
5. As I school board member and a former member of the press, I realize the importance of
information. No voter can make an informed decision without knowing the facts about any bond
proposal. Preventing cities and school boards from spending money to provide those facts is
counterproductive. Although I oppose spending large amounts on unnecessary advertising; some
funds should be spent providing voters with facts about proposed bond elections.
6. I feel that bundling similar items can be helpful; however, bundling an entire proposal denies
the electorate the chance to pass vital items, while refusing those considered frivolous or
unnecessary.
Jennifer Stephens, NWISD Place 5:
I support the proposals as they promote transparency and accountability within the community. It
is important for community members to have access to clear information about how their tax
dollars are being used. These policies would ensure responsible financial management and
uphold trust within the community. I fully support these proposals.
Jon Pendergrass, NWISD Place 6:
YES, I do agree with this 100%. I have said that we should not stop with proposition A,B,C. It
should include all the letters of the alphabet if necessary to clearly state what dollar amounts the
district is requiring. Our ballots have plenty of room to accommodate additional lines of itemized
detail. We also need to ensure that ALL voters are aware of the bond versus a small group of
voters. You could easily ensure this by requiring a 2/3 majority of voters affirm the bond, and hold
bonds during November (uniform) election dates.
Michelle Slater, NWISD Place 7:
I wholeheartedly agree with the proposed guidelines for state and local bond elections. It is
crucial that voters have access to clear and concise information about the current debt obligations
and the potential impact of any new debt proposals. Requiring a 2/3 majority vote and a minimum
of 20% voter turnout ensures that any new debt is approved by a significant portion of the
community. Holding all elections related to budget and debt on the November uniform election
date administered by the County Clerk or the County Elections Administrator promotes
transparency and impartiality. Additionally, it is essential that government entities do not use
taxpayer dollars to promote further indebtedness or spending through mass media. Finally,
bundling of items on bond election ballots is not in the best interest of the community and should
be opposed. Overall, I support these proposals as they promote transparency, accountability, and
responsible fiscal management.
Deb Spencer, Boyd ISD Place 1:
School Bonds are one of those necessary evils. We need them so that our school facilities can be
maintained and function. When the District's population increases and there is no more room for
new students, we need to minimally expand our existing schools. And yes, we understand that it
will cost our community through school taxes. It is a sacrifice for our community. It is a sacrifice
for our children, grandchildren, nieces, nephews and neighbors.
I agree with most of the proposed changes to bond elections:
1. I agree that all debt should be open for review and ultimately considered in a "lump" sum. The
taxpayers deserve to know the bottom line.
3. I agree that the bond issue would have to obtain a yes vote for a minimum of 20% of registered
voters. This is standard practice for state/local bonds.
4. I am in favor of bond elections being held on the November uniform election date instead of
twice a year.
5. I wholeheartedly agree that no tax dollars are to be used in promoting further indebtedness or
spending of taxpayer dollars via mass media.
6. I am in agreement of the opposition of bundling items on bond election ballots. Each item must
be on its on proposition with the total amount requested.
The item I am not in favor of is school bond elections would have to pass with at least a 2/3
majority. I believe school bonds should stay at the current passing of 50%+1.
Cindy Barksdale, Chico ISD Place 7:
I am for 1 and 2, because transparency is important. I would like to know the % of registered
voters that vote in May before I agreed with #3. However, If #4 passed, I would be in favor of #3. I
am for #4 because November elections usually bring out more voters then May elections. I agree
with #5 because that should not come from school budgets. I agree with #6, sometimes they
bundle very good ideas with very bad ideas, which means many vote for the bad to get the good.
Sandra Schneider, Decatur ISD School Board Place 3:
I absolutely agree with 1, 5, and 6. I am uncertain on 2 due to the fact that majority is 50 +1%. I
am against #3 as that would violate the free speech rights / voting voice of those who show up to
vote.
As for #4, I have heard good arguments in favor of this as well as opposed to this.
Jeremy Duncan, Decatur ISD Place 4:
Agree, this would allow for more transparency and the tax payers more flexibility on what they
want their dollars to go towards
Kenneth D. Lee, Alvord ISD Place 6:
Yes I agree
12. TASA/TASB has recently come under fire in some communities as an anti- school/community
partnership force, particularly in conservative districts. What are potential solutions you see to this
problem?
Barbary Kay, Chico ISD Place 6:
The most obvious is for school boards to weigh carefully any items suggested by these entities.
Those which are in direct opposition to local standards should not be approved or acted upon.
Jennifer Stephens, NWISD Place 5:
I believe it is in the best interest of local school boards to part ways with TASB and find alternative
solutions. They are a non-government organization and school boards are not required to partner
with them.
Jon Pendergrass, NWISD Place 6:
I have already spoken to several friends who actively serve within surrounding school boards
within neighboring districts. Some of my friends recently booted TASB as well! There are plenty of
alternative solutions to preparing and training incoming and current School Board members. This
is one of the greatest things about our Country is competition. Let this serve as a lesson to
organizations who begin to take strong political stances regarding our public education system
such as TASB.
Michelle Slater, NWISD Place 7:
I believe that the relationship between TASA/TASB and our district should be re-evaluated to
ensure that it aligns with our community's values and priorities. It is important to ensure that they
do not hinder our ability to effectively represent our community and make decisions in the best
interest of our students. One solution would be to explore alternative resources and partnerships
that better align with our values and goals for academic excellence. I am committed to ensuring
that our district's decisions are made with the utmost transparency and accountability, and I will
work tirelessly to ensure that our community's voice is heard and represented in all aspects of our
district's operations.
Deb Spencer, Boyd ISD Place 1:
I do agree that TASB is a liberal anti-school/community partnership force. I believe that Boyd ISD
should withdraw from TASB and pursue other conservative organizations like Innovative Teachers
of Texas. I recently received 6 CEU credits from a class I took through ITTexas and they
repeatedly spoke of their conservative values and leadership. They are building an alternative to
the organizations we have historically relied upon for necessary things like insurance, legislative
advocacy, and peer support.
Cindy Barksdale, Chico ISD Place 7:
TASA and TASB have spend years working as one of the main Trojan horses to bring liberal
policies from larger school districts in to more conservative schools. I first noticed this over 20
years ago with the grading policy of everyone on report cards cannot receive less than a 50.
When we heard that Dallas ISD made this policy, we said it would never happen here. However,
within 2 years that policy was the law of the land. The current opinion from TASB I vehemently
disagree with is that transgender students can use the bathroom in which they identify. I disagree
with this opinion and would vote against this as policy.
Sandra Schneider, Decatur ISD School Board Place 3:
I think that other options should be explored if TASB does not uphold our community values, with
Decatur ISD looking seriously at the relationship with TASB and exploring our options, similar to
what Southlake Carroll is doing.
Jeremy Duncan, Decatur ISD Place 4:
Finding alternative training and online policies association
Kenneth D. Lee, Alvord ISD Place 6:
We need to come together on this - Race, Urban education, Family-School-Community
partnership and critical race theory in education. Safe Learning Environment, Family
engagement, Mentoring/Tutoring and Educational Technology
13. What is the relationship and function of the SHAC with Board Members?
Barbary Kay, Chico ISD Place 6:
The SHAC committee is a parent/staff committee tasked by the legislature with ensuring the
social, emotional, and physical health of students accomplished. It serves an advisory committee
to the board in these areas.
Jennifer Stephens, NWISD Place 5:
As a school board member, I recognize the critical role of the School Health Advisory Council in
prioritizing the health and safety of our students. Composed of community members, health
professionals, parents, and teachers, this council brings valuable perspectives to the table. I am
committed to working with this council and carefully considering their advice and
recommendations in order to ensure the well-being of our students. I will actively engage with the
School Health Advisory Council to ensure that their insights are taken into account in all relevant
matters related to student health and safety. Together, we can work towards creating a nurturing
and supportive environment for our students to thrive in
Jon Pendergrass, NWISD Place 6:
The purpose of the school health advisory council is to (advise) the board. These are not elected
members. These are members of the community. The Board can take recommendations from
SHAC; however, it is up to the Board to choose what course of action the district will adopt and
approve.
Michelle Slater, NWISD Place 7:
The SHAC, or School Health Advisory Council, is an important resource for Board Members. The
SHAC is made up of parents, community members, health professionals, and educators who
work to promote and support the health and well-being of our students. As a Board Member, I
would work closely with the SHAC to ensure that their recommendations are taken into
consideration when making decisions that affect the health and safety of our students.
Deb Spencer, Boyd ISD Place 1:
The Board of Trustees and the SHAC must work hand-in-hand concerning their District's Health
and Character Education. The School Health Advisory Council (SHAC) is an integral committee
that assists the district in ensuring Local community values are reflected in Health Education
instruction. The SHAC is appointed by the Board of Trustees. The School Board must consider
the recommendations of the SHAC before adopting or changing the district's health education
curriculum or instruction. The SHAC makes policy recommendations to the Board regarding
student health and character education. The SHAC is responsible for making recommendations
to the Board regarding appropriate grade levels and methods of instruction for human sexuality
and the prevention of child abuse, family violence, dating violence and sex trafficking.
Cindy Barksdale, Chico ISD Place 7:
The SHAC reviews and suggests curriculum for the board to approve concerning Health class,
SB9, and human sexuality. It is important to listen to the SHAC as parents and staff are both
involved. My son is a member of the Chico ISD SHAC committee.
Sandra Schneider, Decatur ISD School Board Place 3:
I believe that district and community members should work together to make sure community
values are upheld in the teaching of Health to our students.
Jeremy Duncan, Decatur ISD Place 4:
Give direction to the board to creat policy that have community values
Kenneth D. Lee, Alvord ISD Place 6:
The majority of the members are parents of the students enrolled in the district and who
are not employed by the district
14. In 87R/HB3979 the Texas Governor and legislators banned the teaching of Critical Race Theory
in Texas schools. As a school board member, what are your thoughts on CRT and will you
commit to making sure that CRT is not taught in any form to our children?
Barbary Kay, Chico ISD Place 6:
As a member of the board who vetoed the use of Critical Race Theory in our district, I approve of
this ban and will continue to vote against inclusion in our curriculum.
Jennifer Stephens, NWISD Place 5:
While CRT has been banned in Texas, I believe it is still present in our classrooms in the form of
social emotional learning (SEL). Recently, Texas made changes to the curriculum requiring
school districts to teach character traits and therefore school districts across the state have
defended their use of SEL as a way to implement that newly mandated curriculum. The problem
with SEL is that instead of districts utilizing this framework to help students develop critical
thinking skills on how to think so that they can become independent individuals, they teach them
what to think. SEL has been abused by some districts to protect the rights of subset populations
over others to force tolerance of certain situations. This is indoctrination, not education. I am
committed to making sure that no CRT related materials or programs get into our schools.
Jon Pendergrass, NWISD Place 6:
I will personally stand in the way of CRT from ever being taught in (any) of our schools. People do
not care what you expect. People care about what you inspect. Our district needs to ensure we
walk and chew gum at the same time. We need to be working on achieving academic excellence
and prevent individuals from breaking the law and teaching CRT.
Michelle Slater, NWISD Place 7:
I fully support the recent ban on teaching Critical Race Theory in Texas schools. CRT is a divisive
and harmful ideology that promotes discrimination and creates an unhealthy learning environment
for our children. I am committed to ensuring that CRT is not taught in any form to our children in
our school district, and I commit to adding policy around CRT so the impact of the law is clear
within the district. I will work tirelessly to protect our children from harmful ideologies and ensure
that our schools remain a place of learning and growth.
Deb Spencer, Boyd ISD Place 1:
I am highly opposed to Critical Race Theory (CRT). It is a false teaching. The most deceptive
aspect of Social/Emotional Learning (SEL) is the fact that it is the backdoor, or “Trojan Horse”, for
critical race theory and gender ideology. We must be actively aware of any aspects of it in our
District. (CRT) recognizes that racism is ingrained in the fabric and system of American society
and these structures are based on white privilege. This is a liberal lie. Because of the deception, it
may not be called CRT in schools since it is so controversial: but be aware, it can be in any
subject of your child’s curriculum. It is my goal to honor the core curriculum and fight for its rightful
place at Boyd ISD. Our school should be free of political and social agenda and remain focused
on the primary goal of education to prepare the next generation for success through the
concentration of basic core knowledge and skills.
Cindy Barksdale, Chico ISD Place 7:
CRT should not be taught in schools as it is a Marxist thought system that depicts white people
as oppressors and other ethnicity as the oppressed. I would vote against any policy or curriculum
that teaches CRT.
Sandra Schneider, Decatur ISD School Board Place 3:
I do not agree with critical race theory nor do I think it should be taught in any form to our
children. I have a policy ready to go that I would like for our school board to adopt banning the
teaching of CRT.
Jeremy Duncan, Decatur ISD Place 4:
CRT does not belong in schools and I will fight to keep out
Kenneth D. Lee, Alvord ISD Place 6:
I fully support the Texas Governor and its legislators